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Black History Month: “X” and Sam Cooke

Black History Month: “X” and Sam Cooke

I always feel torn about relegated “months” of appreciation. Historically marginalized groups should be recognized within curriculum–I have no argument with that–but I also believe that a well-constructed curriculum should explore many races/groups throughout the entire year in conversation with one another. The, “It’s February so everything we read needs to be by a Black … Continue reading

The Rare Experience of Punctum

The Rare Experience of Punctum

When I wrote the curriculum for the Arts in NYC course that I am currently teaching at my community college, I wanted a concept to guide it. I have written before about two amazing professors from my undergraduate experience who largely formed  how I study and experience all forms of art: Carol Mavor and elin … Continue reading

My Little Test Taker

My Little Test Taker

(This was written/posted about a week ago…then WordPress opened  on my iPhone in my bag to my posts page, and I deleted this post on accident. Ugh. Therefore–repost!) Sunday afternoon/evening brings the inevitable “Have you done all your homework?” question to Alexandra, our first grader. Each weekend she has to read two level-appropriate books, do … Continue reading

Collaborative Reading Exercise

Whenever I have a lesson planning mental block, I pull out my trustworthy NYCWP Satellite Institute binder. A few weeks back, I had on the syllabus that I would go over the text the students had read in Summerbridge: Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Saffron Foer. We were to talk about the idea … Continue reading

YA Blog Worth Following

When I posted about my YA binge reading obsession, I couldn’t remember the YA Lit blog that I love, but she just posted (one of the perks of following someone’s blog) , and her blog is: For the Love of Books And for any of you teaching middle or high school, I highly recommend it.

Map of Racial Segregation in the US

Map of Racial Segregation in the US

This week was my first week of classes. Our first six-week study in City Seminar I is on transportation, particularly the transportation system (trains, buses, MTA) here in New York City and in other urban spaces globally. This topic will be explored in all three course components of our Freshman Seminar course which is called … Continue reading

YA Binge Reading

YA Binge Reading

In addition to cleaning like a maniac as a form of procrastination before the school year starts (btw, I did finish a full-fledged top to bottom cleaning of our apartment!), I also binge read Young Adult (YA) literature. I used to read YA literature because I was a high school English teacher and I needed … Continue reading

Mosse Book Club

Mosse Book Club

Here’s a photograph of me and my mosse at our elementary school’s benefit auction. Yes, you read that correctly–my mosse as I named it. My mom posse. The mosse was born at the beginning of pre-K when Charlotte, the one in the navy blue dress, emailed all the moms in our pre-K class and suggested … Continue reading

My Work is Done.

My Work is Done.

Oh, my poor neglected blog. I have missed writing. I have a running list of everything I need/want to write about, and this list gets tackled NOW. It’s hard to walk around with these ideas circulating in my head; they begin to insert themselves, compose themselves, and become themselves at very inopportune moments, like when … Continue reading

This Book Made Me Throw Up (in a good way)

I have been sitting here staring at the screen for about 20 minutes. I have been avoiding this post for about 4 weeks. I don’t even know why. About a month ago, I read two books back to back: The Still Point of the Turning World by Emily Rapp and Wave by Sonali Deraniyagala. I … Continue reading