Tagged with teaching

You can’t make this up…

I was always amused by the cast of quirky characters I encountered teaching. I must admit that in my two years since moving to teaching college, the characters are largely less colorful. So are the students. But that’s another post. One particularly colorful character was the Spanish teacher, Ms. Martinez. Originally from Puerto Rico, she … Continue reading

My School Family

Tonight I am going to my old high school’s Christmas party. No doubt I will drink too much and require a lot of coffee, gatorade, and bacon tomorrow morning. That’s how we do it. I worked at Cobble Hill School of American Studies for 10 years. I got a job there after teaching one year … Continue reading

Racial Microaggressions Linger

Racial Microaggressions Linger

One of the best things I studied during my time at Teachers College was the work of Derald Wing Sue on racial microaggressions. A psychologist, he argues that the small things we do and say speak volumes about our inner racist beliefs and that they are noted and noticed by those on the receiving end. … Continue reading

Teaching After a Disaster

Teaching After a Disaster

We have been out of school for a week now. The public school teachers had to report to work today in NYC-that’s 80,000 employees trying to weave their way to their school buildings amid a major lack of transportation, personal losses, and a lack of childcare of their own children. They are going to prepare … Continue reading

What is Academic Rigor?!

My years in the classroom were filled with educational jargon. When you work in a failing school, educational reform movements and their key words are birthed into your classroom after gestating in what I imagine to be windowless rooms where policymakers stare at data. One hot term that circulated was academic rigor. Upon being observed, … Continue reading

Writing Down the Grief

Writing Down the Grief

Today marks sixteen years since my dad passed away. Diagnosed with juvenile onset diabetes around 1950, it is pretty amazing that he lived until 1996, until he was 61 years old. He was a diabetic for years before individuals tested their own blood sugar by pricking their fingers at home. Since his insulin shots were … Continue reading

The Dream of a Common Language

The Dream of a Common Language

I have always been a reluctant poetry teacher. April comes around and it’s National Poetry Month and I would slouch towards teaching enough poetry to keep my administrator off my back. I reluctantly put a poem in my pocket and I go through the motions like a good teacher should, but poetry is not my … Continue reading